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  • MusedFable

    MusedFable

    March 11, 2015, 6:14 am

    You'll have a much greater impact on local elections. They are important too. Sheriff, mayor, judges, schoolboard. That shit matters. It's how your neighbors kids are educated, and how the local justice system works, and how infrastructure is built and businesses encouraged to come in.

    Beyond that are the state elections where you can have a meaningful impact. State house and senate pass all kinds of important things.

    Electing your U.S. Senator and Representative is also important. Many times they only win by less than a 100 votes. For example Al Frankin. That makes a difference.

    Yes, the impact on the presidential vote is smaller. Especially with the electoral college and how swing states have a much greater impact. Doesn't mean they don't pay attention to how big of a margin they got in some states, or how much a third party is pulling votes.

    Voting does matter.

    Reply

  • Yarvit12

    Yarvit12

    March 10, 2015, 6:39 am

    If you're college age and want to enjoy some of the night life, hit up "Half Fast subs" on the hill for a while for some of the real college atmosphere, then head down to pearl street for the bars, I'd recommend hitting The Walrus and then The Foundry if you're into the classic frat / sorority party atmosphere, with the walrus being your classic dive bar and the foundry being a wanna-be upscale semi dance joint with a nice rooftop. If you're looking for a more chill time check out the sundowner, catacombs or Conor O'Neills which are all decent places just to get a pitcher and pool.

    Anyways, boulder is great fun, the day stuff is awesome and the night life is decent. Have fun man.

    Reply

  • NoMoreNicksLeft

    NoMoreNicksLeft

    March 10, 2015, 3:22 pm

    > hmm is he safer during day time hours or the night shift?

    Refuse the night shift. Most people do, to fit in with the rest of their schedule. Or, if you think I'm wrong and this really happens, get a class action lawsuit going... I'm sure you could earn millions that way.

    > Our nation has plenty of dangerous jobs.

    Really? Yeh, that's why life expectancy goes up every year. Only on reddit could someone claim that because there's a 1 in 100,000 chance you'll die at work that it's somehow a "dangerous job".

    Reply

  • mailinator1138

    mailinator1138

    March 11, 2015, 8:55 am

    People *definitely* watch too much TV. I like that particular show since it's always interesting to see how Americans deal with cultures other than their own (and how they treat other people when out of their familiar, comfortable elements). And it's also interesting getting small glimpses of the cultures themselves from the viewpoints of noisy Americans on missions.

    Most Americans are dreadfully ethnocentric. I believe a little travel works wonders in us Americans, giving us a snapshot of things we'd never otherwise see (or perhaps, believe). It also helps coax us out of our typical ways of seeing life, stretching our thinking about people much more--and perhaps reduces the whole "us vs. them" thinking so easy to pick up otherwise.

    The closest I've been to that region (which isn't very close) is all over Poland (the photo you sent--architecture, style of roads with electric buses--reminds me of Warsaw a bit).

    Reply

  • ayrnieu

    ayrnieu

    March 11, 2015, 9:32 am

    > SS Tax is not a tax. It's a[n involuntary loan to the government.]

    Or "an involuntary exchange of promised money for present money". Likewise, road taxes are not really taxes, because they are really involuntary exchanges of road maintenance for money; income taxes are not really taxes, because they are really involuntary exchanges of security and general good governance for money.

    Thanks, this clears things up.

    > [victimhood of %N leads to %N of people having a sense of 'civic responsibility'; for small numbers of N, you get a plutocracy.]

    Well, so what if a small number of people rule, if they have all this 'civic responsibility' by virtue of being stolen from? You didn't say about this, but do you suppose that deeper taxation leads to deeper feelings of responsibility?

    > [Violent demands that] people [']contribute['] financially is entirely appropriate and democratic

    i.e., appropriate democracy is that system of government wherein *nobody* is free - where each person is enslaved 30% of the time or so, as opposed to less-appropriate democracies where some can keep more of their produce than others.

    I don't know, I think we should care less about temporal things like this and work at ensuring that virulent disease strikes everyone at about the same rate, to replace apathy and uninvolvement with some 'medical responsibility'.

    To take another tack: a cry of the revolution was "No taxation without representation!" Now you are saying that Americans should lament their 'representation without taxation'.

    Reply

  • LOLTofu

    LOLTofu

    March 11, 2015, 4:12 am

    They do! I actually had an omnivore abandon the deep fried turkey he brought to my omni-veggie-vegan mix up Thanksgiving in favor of Bryanna's roast, telling me my turkey was better! Do you have a stand mixer? I feel like with a blender for the "tofu milkshake" part and stand mixer to knead the seitan, most of the work for the roast is just passive waiting around time, perfect for making mashed potatoes, curried yam samosas, veggie stuffing, seitan sausage arancini, fresh breads, Szechuan green beans, wild rice stuffed delicata squash, vanilla coconut ice cream with homemade hot fudge, brownies, peanut butter stuffed chocolate cookies, and cocoa nib chocolate chip cookies (this is a partial recollection of my menu from last year).

    Reply

  • Fimbulfamb

    Fimbulfamb

    March 11, 2015, 3:03 am

    I'm a strict rational- and empiricist. I've experienced temperatures between -10°C and -20°C at least, although we didn't always have a thermometer in the coolest winters, especially in 2003.

    Assuming you're talking about wireless hots spots, no. I live in the countryside where they're close to nonexistent. Regarding the geological hot spots, of which the countryside has rather more, I don't hang out there too much either, as I'm a bit averse to swimming and similar activity. And it saddens me that I haven't got any photos of *Aurora Borealis* to share, although I will say that a few nights ago I was going to sleep with the curtains not drawn, and I saw the most vivid northern lights I have seen in a while. (We notice the solar cycle quite well here.)

    I like Iceland quite well, thank you, so well, in fact, that I greeted your stellar idea of posting this IAmA as a great opportunity to set some things straight regarding this fine country ;)

    Reply

  • AMerrickanGirl

    AMerrickanGirl

    March 11, 2015, 1:48 am

    >I believe you are simply young an ignorant enough

    I'm fifty years old, divorced with two grown children, and have been in and out of the gay community for 15 years (I'm bi). I know perfectly well how much it costs to raise children.

    >While some gay couple may emulate the traditional marital practices- most do not.

    How do you know this? Have you studied gay couples? Most gay people I know live pretty much like everybody else. They're not out wearing feathers every night and marching in parades.

    Reply

  • magicalnoodles

    magicalnoodles

    March 10, 2015, 4:18 pm

    Once I get to Vancouver (is that the best place to go in Canada (of which I am a citizen)), I might have about 500 dollars. Then I'll be lost. Where do I start? I don't have the life skills required to get a place, job, etc. I have never paid a bill my entire life. Help me, I have three weeks to visualize and plan my future.

    I emigrated to Korea before graduating from HS. Can I join the army (I'm 29 years old). I'm a bit scared of ending up homeless or on welfare.

    I was the primary breadwinner of my family and sent my sister and father through college, but now I need to do something for myself. I am afraid, but look forward to the freedom of living by and for myself.

    Some guidance please.

    Reply

  • realitysfringe

    realitysfringe

    March 10, 2015, 9:07 pm

    Something like Adblock, Greasemonkey (Javascript personalization), and a theme handler (Firefox Personas) would add no clutter at all.

    Other options would probably add an extra button or two, but Chrome is so minimalist already that you wouldn't really notice. Since they're optional, I don't see it being a problem.

    Also, I've *never* noticed a performance decrease using FF extensions. Chrome is faster than FF for me, so if Google can keep that speed with a few handy extensions, I'd make it my default browser. right now, though, Mozilla is king for a reason.

    Reply

  • kindof_blue

    kindof_blue

    March 10, 2015, 5:25 pm

    To argue that grammar has ever been constructed with hermaphrodites or gender neutrals in mind is silly. Also, the original poster indicates by the nature of his sentence that he has one particular person in mind, so your suggestion that he didn't is a purposeful misreading of the sentence. If he wished to not single out anyone in particular, the proper phrasing would have been, "someone" or "a person" rather than "one person." Appropriate pronouns in English for that situation include the general use of the term "he" or "he/she." You may dislike English grammar, and that's fine, but that is not a proper use of the term "they" because it muddles the subject number. Either way, seeing as how the picture features many people, the best way to phrase this sentence would have been "Wanna see a picture of people who realized they ARE NOT at the center of the universe?"

    Reply

  • sjs

    sjs

    March 11, 2015, 12:29 am

    To be fair web apps from MS traditionally break in most non-IE browsers between upgrades and then users must wait until they get off their ass to fix Hotmail (or whatever) for Firefox, *again*. Google has gone out of their way to get this to work well in IE by offering Chrome Frame, and still having it work as well as possible in IE without it. Wave also works in Firefox and Safari.

    Google has built this on open standards. MS rarely uses existing standards when they can create their own incompatible standard instead.

    Comparisons between Google and MS are starting to be popular because of Google's size, but they are all bogus because MS has a history that Google just doesn't have.

    Reply

  • nhand42

    nhand42

    March 11, 2015, 8:26 am

    > Clear property rights = ownership. It translates into the profits and the losses are borne by the risk taker because the person who controls said property uses knowledge and intuition to figure out the best way to use this thing.

    No. That's a simplistic (i.e. naive) view of economics that wouldn't get past first year students. Actual systems are far more complex than you seem to believe.

    > What the United States has is most certainly not capitalism.

    Yes, it is. That it's not working is a sad indictment on capitalism and how it tends to self destruct. That's the point of Moore's film, and in fact the same opinion held by the most highly educated economists.

    Reply

  • lastshot

    lastshot

    March 10, 2015, 6:51 am

    Very good. After sending you the above, I remembered how at Netflix they had this biggedy-big contest to see who could do **10%** better at predicting what people were going to like. Mind you, that's 10% better than awful. Their predictions stink in almost every case, and as you say, I'm not the same from one viewing to the next of even the same movie.

    Just think of how often a friend recommends a comedy to you as really funny, and not only is there barely a single laugh in it, but for one reason or another it's actually painful to watch, or at the end you proclaim to yourself what a waste of time it was, and set about to see what you can adjust in your selection criteria to keep that from happening again.

    One thing that helps me alot with movies is the attitude that if out of 10 or 20 movies I watch, I like one or two, that's pretty good. After trying out every criterion I can think of, who is the director, what does rottentomatoes say, do I like the trailer.. there is no way I'll know if I'll like it. I saw William Friedkin's Sorcerer (1977) the other night. He said he thought it was the thing he's proudest of. Solid thumb down from me. I gave it a shot. I'm glad I would.

    Reply

  • gwildor

    gwildor

    March 10, 2015, 7:08 pm

    im not a huge fan of guns.. i dont really have a use for them.... IM not a fan. you can do what you want.

    and i fell that way about most any law. my policy: mid your own business.

    most arguments FOR gun control really only apply to people that dont follow laws anyways. so what difference does it make if gun are illegal. sure, your neighbor wont have one any more, butt that also means he wont be able to, potentially, help you out, when the people that dont care what the law says pulls a gun on you.

    Reply

  • tobybuk

    tobybuk

    March 10, 2015, 4:01 pm

    You admit you did the same, thanks. The part we disagree on is when you stopped if indeed you did.

    Its very easy to take the moral high ground when you have F16 fighters and laser guided bombs to fight against glorified fireworks.

    Look at the text here. Whilst calling for anyone’s slaughter is morally questionable they are rightly angry at the hundreds of children the racist child killing chemical weapon using terror state killed in the Gaza atrocity.

    The people they are calling for the slaughter of had recently been on the slaughtering themselves! Its unbelievable that the Israeli terrorist can complain someone whats them dead when the reality is they are 10 times worse themselves. While the Gaza people mostly talk hot air about this the terror state just goes and kills.

    If someone had murdered my kids I assure you I’d be equally pissed.

    Reply

  • ssylvan

    ssylvan

    March 11, 2015, 6:38 am

    > A second CS student wouldn't be able to write something like C because they lack a intuitive understanding of the machine and which approaches are easy and which are not.

    I said they would be able to *implement* a language of the level of abstraction of C, but with a sensible semantics (not necessarily design it). C was good for it's day, perhaps (though I kind of wish they would've started with Modula 2 or something instead), but I can't take anyone seriously who claims that C isn't rife with problems when evaluated from a modern perspective.

    Inertia *is* caused by common sense, but that doesn't make the language any better! I fully recognize that for most applications dealing with all the numerous shortcomings of C is a better alternative than gambling on some new replacement. But again, that doesn't make C the superior language on technical merit. It's the superior option due to already being entrenched, not because it's technically better.

    Reply

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